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Hazardous Rail Cargo

FILE - In this June 21, 2009 file photo, railroad freight cars are seen destroyed after a fiery explosion that killed one person are next to the train tracks following a derailment June 19 in Rockford, Ill. For two decades, one of the nation’s most common types of rail tanker, known as a DOT-111, has been allowed to haul hazardous liquids from coast to coast even though transportation officials were aware of a dangerous design flaw that almost guarantees the car will tear open in an accident. The rail and chemical industries have committed to a safer design for new tankers, but they do not want to modify tens of thousands of existing cars. That’s despite a spike in the number of accidents. (AP Photo/Rockford Register Star, Scott Morgan, File) MANDATORY CREDIT

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Hazardous Rail Cargo

In this Aug. 8, 2012 photo, a DOT-111 rail tanker passes through Council Bluffs, Iowa. For two decades, DOT-111 rail tankers, workhorses of the American rail fleet, have been allowed to haul hazardous liquids from coast to coast even though transportation officials were aware of a dangerous design flaw that almost guarantees the car will tear open in an accident. The rail and chemical industries have committed to a safer design for new tankers, but they do not want to modify tens of thousands of existing cars. That’s despite a spike in the number of accidents. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)