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Response to Zika Virus in South America

01 / 08

Brazil Zika Mosquito Eradication

In this Feb. 1, 2016 photo, a technician from the British biotec company Oxitec holds a container of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that were genetically modified to produce offspring that don't live, in Campinas, Brazil, before releasing them into the wild as part of an effort to kill the local Aedes population, a vector for the Zika virus. The concern is not the disease itself, Zika’s immediate effects are mild, consisting mostly of a moderate fever and a rash, and only a fifth of those afflicted notice any symptoms. But Brazilian authorities say also they have detected a spike in cases of microcephaly, which leaves infants with unusually small heads and can result in brain damage and a host of developmental and health problems. The link between Zika and microcephaly is as yet unproven. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

02 / 08

Brazil Zika Virus

Isabela Cristina, 18, who is six months pregnant, shows a photo of her ultrasound at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. Isabela Cristina was struck with Zika and was worried about the health of her bay, but her baby's ultrasound scan and other exams turned up normal. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika virus outbreak, spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is well-adapted to humans, thrives in people's homes and can breed in even a bottle cap's-worth of stagnant water. The virus is suspected to be linked with occurrences of microcephaly in new born babies. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

03 / 08

Brazil Zika Virus

Geovania do Nascimento, who is almost nine months pregnant, undergoes an ultrasound scan at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika virus outbreak, spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is well-adapted to humans, thrives in people's homes and can breed in even a bottle cap's-worth of stagnant water. The virus is suspected to be linked with occurrences of microcephaly in new born babies. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

04 / 08

Brazil Zika Mosquito Eradication

In this Feb. 1, 2016 photo, a technician from the British biotec company Oxitec holds with a bag of blood to feed Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that were genetically modified to produce offspring that don't live, before releasing them into the wild as part of an effort to kill the local Aedes population, which is a vector for the spread of the Zika virus, in Campinas, Brazil. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika outbreak and authorities say they have also detected a spike in cases of microcephaly in newborn children, but the link between Zika and microcephaly is as yet unproven. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

05 / 08

Brazil Zika Mosquito Eradication

In this Feb. 1, 2016 photo, a technician from the British biotec company Oxitec, inspects the pupae of genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, a vector for transmitting the Zika virus, in Campinas, Brazil. The company said tests begun last April as part of a dengue-fighting program in the small southeastern city of Piracicaba suggested the release of the GM males reduced the wild Aedes larvae population in the target neighborhood by more than 80 percent. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika outbreak and authorities say they have also detected a spike in cases of microcephaly in newborn children, but the link between Zika and microcephaly is as yet unproven. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

06 / 08

Brazil Zika Mosquito Eradication

In this Feb. 1, 2016 photo, a technician from the British biotec company Oxitec releases male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that were genetically modified to produce offspring that don't live, in Piracicaba, Brazil, as part of an effort to kill the local Aedes population that transmits the Zika virus. With Zika already recorded in 19 Brazilian states and widely expected to continue spreading throughout Brazil, some experts doubt that Oxitec’s GM mosquitoes offer a realistic solution to the spiraling health crisis. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

07 / 08

Brazil Zika Mosquito Eradication

In this Feb. 1, 2016 photo, Guilherme Trivellato, from the British biotec company Oxitec, releases genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, a vector for transmitting the Zika virus, in Piracicaba, Brazil, as part of an effort to kill the local Aedes population. Oxitec officials insist the company has the capacity to scale up the program to tackle even large cities such as Recife, a sprawling seaside metropolis that’s the epicenter of Brazil’s Zika outbreak. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

08 / 08

Brazil Zika Virus

Marcia Maria, who is seven months pregnant, waits to be examined at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika virus outbreak, spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is well-adapted to humans, thrives in people's homes and can breed in even a bottle cap's-worth of stagnant water. The virus is suspected to be linked with occurrences of microcephaly in new born babies, but no link has been proven yet. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)