Patient Care

Has an employee ever come into your office and rattled off one negative story after another about a coworker? Usually, the conversation starts harmlessly, about a minor problem, such as a spotlight being burned out or the need for another uniform shirt. But then the topic shifts to other complaints, namely the "bad" employee. Soon you're listening to a monologue of epithets and anecdotes, including how just watching that person makes their skin crawl. Then, the final blow: "You need to get rid of this guy/gal."
Cardiac & Resuscitation

Most EMS agencies require applicants to submit a resum in addition to filling out a job application, and getting a new often job depends on how well you sell yourself in your resum . As a self-marketing tool, a resum is more than an outline of your career and education; it s a short, easy-to-read report of why the organization should hire you over another candidate. Here are some tips to help you start from scratch or tweak your current resum to develop the best presentation of your qualifications.
Columns

I have already made my feelings on merit badge medicine known [see We Don t Need No Stinkin Badges! ]. These courses are OK for continuing education but should never be required as a condition of employment or certification. However, I would like to turn our attention to the phenomena of Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) and Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS). These two courses are among the most popular merit badge courses in EMS. But there seems to be some redundancy between the two, and wherever there is redundancy, there is increased cost.
Columns

I have already made my feelings on merit badge medicine known [see We Don t Need No Stinkin Badges! ]. These courses are OK for continuing education but should never be required as a condition of employment or certification. However, I would like to turn our attention to the phenomena of Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) and Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS). These two courses are among the most popular merit badge courses in EMS. But there seems to be some redundancy between the two, and wherever there is redundancy, there is increased cost.
Major Incidents

Within an hour of the Trade Center attacks, 23 EMS supervisors had been dispatched, along with 29 ALS units and 58 BS units. Eight hours later, 31 EMS supervisors had been dispatched and were working with approximately 400 on scene EMS personnel, including 47 ALS units (28 from voluntary hospitals) and 98 BLS units (23 from voluntary hospitals).
Major Incidents

On Sept. 11, 2001, EMS personnel worked under unimaginable circumstances. Many crews faced death twice within a time span of less than 60 minutes. EMS personnel were forced to render care under true battlefield conditions. While in the middle of patient care, crews had to run for cover to save their own lives, contrary to the usual course of events at an MCI. What follows are their personal accounts: graphic, descriptive and, most importantly, in their own words.
Major Incidents

Orlando Martinez, EMT, FDNY EMS, was one block away from the World Trade Center when the first plane hit. After he and his partner, Frank Puma, transported a patient who’d been critically injured by part of a plane’s landing gear to NYU Downtown Hospital, he called his girlfriend, Maddalena Passarella, and told her a plane had hit the World Trade Center. “I told her I was OK and that I had to go back in to help more injured people,” says Martinez. “She told me to be safe and call her as soon as I could.”