EMS Today Conference

Corey Slovis, MD, is the medical director of the Nashville Fire Department. He also chairs the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and is on the editorial board of JEMS. He’s a well-known nationally renowned educator and focused his talk on potentially practice changing articles that EMS providers should be familiar with. Slovis touched on the most important articles over the past 12 months, as well as the practice changing concepts, changes in the standard of care and important new facts for EMTs and paramedics to focus on.
EMS Today Conference

Peter O’Meara, PhD, discussed community paramedicine programs with an international panel at EMS Today 2015. He focused on the questions, “How and why they are emerging all over the world?” O’Meara, from Australia, Mike Nolan, from Canada, and Gary Wingrove, from the U.S., will talked about the philosophy and aims behind community paramedicine programs, what they do, who they benefit, funding options and more. Some additional key points made by O’Meara were:
Administration and Leadership

Matt Zavadsky, MS-HSA, talked about how economic sustainability is the Achilles’ Heel for many MIH-CP programs—payers want to know what the business model is and how this service line brings them value. He went on to talk about how successfully attaining sustainable revenue requires an acumen some EMS leaders may not possess and what you need to know to make an MIH program financially viable. Some additional key points Matt made were:
EMS Today Conference

EMS innovator Shaughn Maxwell showed why EMS checklists will take you to the next level of performance capability. In an ever increasing world of speed and complexity, we can’t remember everything and it can impact the outcome of our patients. Maxwell focused on how checklists are your secret weapon against human fallibility and how science proves it.
EMS Today Conference

Award-winner and EMS innovator Shaughn Maxwell took audiences through two unique historic disasters in 2014. When a major landslide occurred in Oso, Wash., there was no pre-established playbook. In addition to rescue operations; an EMS response system was needed to care for hundreds of rescuers in this remote and dangerous environment. No one could expect that within six months, on the opposite side of the Cascade Mountain Range, the largest wildfire in state history would cut off a rural valley from the rest of the world. Some additional key points Shaughn made were: