Communications & Dispatch

New Orleans EMS crews were forced to operate in a non-existent incident command environment and without communications with their personnel throughout the first four days of the incident.
Administration and Leadership

Prehospital clinical medicine as we know it changed during Katrina. For the first time in modern EMS, major metropolitan crews became stranded along with their residents. Crews seasoned in hurricane response, ready to respond to the needs of their communities, suddenly found themselves trapped on urban islands, unable to respond even after the most damaging conditions subsided.
Communications & Dispatch

Setting the Stage Moments earlier, a distraught man parks his Jeep Cherokee straddling a set of railroad tracks and facing north, pointed in the direction of an approaching southbound commuter train headed for L.A.'s Union Station. The driver exits his vehicle, pours gasoline in and around the SUV, and then flees.
Administration and Leadership

As many of you head to Philadelphia for the EMS Today Conference this month, some of your colleagues will attend another seminar, the Terrible EMS Leadership Conference. This secret conference is where EMS managers with poor leadership skills enhance their knack for mismanaging their organizations and employees. I recently received the brochure in the mail, and some of the courses sound interesting. Here are just a few:
Administration and Leadership

Each year, JEMS surveys first responders and transport agencies from the metropolitan areas of the nation's 200 most populous cities. From Boston to Los Angeles, from Anchorage, Alaska, to Miami, from your part of America to ours, and everything in between, the survey aims to capture a feel for us all. The result is a unique glimpse into an ever-evolving industry. The 200-City Survey offers communities, providers, administrators and medical directors a snapshot of facts and trends that can be used to develop internal benchmarks.
Communications & Dispatch

You and your partner are on your station's daily grocery run when the unexpected happens: Dispatch alerts units of a possible trench collapse in a construction area just one block from the grocery store where you're shopping. As you arrive on scene and park your ambulance, it hits you: Dirt! There's dirt everywhere. So are construction equipment with engines idling, a half-buried man having breathing difficulty and about 65 people who all want to know what you're going to do about the awful situation.