Administration and Leadership

A new World Health Organisation (WHO) report paints a worrying picture about the drug-resistant strands of tuberculosis (TB).In a survey of more than 90,000 patients in 81 countries, the WHO found that levels of TB resistant to a range of drugs were far higher than expected."What we found in this new report is that we have levels that are unprecedented, which no one would have [expected]," said Dr Mario Raviglione, director of tuberculosis research at the WHO.
Communications & Dispatch

Dallas Fire-Rescue officials say a five-minute delay between the time that fire dispatchers learned a motorcycle officer had crashed and paramedics were first told to go to the scene occurred because they were having trouble getting a good address for the Houston Street viaduct."We have to have an exact address or intersection," Fire Section Chief David Kinney said during a Monday news conference also attended by Fire Chief Eddie Burns and fire and police public information officers at Jack Evans Police Headquarters.
Communications & Dispatch

JEMS.com Editor's Note: For more, check out A.J. Heightman's article "Motorcades Require Advanced Planning."DALLAS -- Officials are investigating a five-minute delay between when Dallas Fire-Rescue dispatchers learned a motorcycle officer had crashed and when paramedics were first told to go to the scene.They are also trying to understand why police dispatchers had trouble generating a written order for help immediately.
Communications & Dispatch

ALLENTOWN, Pa. -- In the aftermath of its dispatchers' mishandling of a Jan. 29 distress call from a disabled woman who died in a Doylestown house fire, Bucks County (Pa.) will ask the state Emergency Management Agency to audit its 911 center."That will be a universal review from an outside independent agency," county Commissioner Chairman James Cawley said after the commissioners meeting Wednesday.
Communications & Dispatch

SHELTON, Conn. -- The Shelton, Conn., Police Department is looking to get the "411" on city residents who have special medical needs."We are trying to develop a database of persons living within the city limits who have a medical condition or handicap," police Capt. Michael Madden said.
Administration and Leadership

LONDON -- MORE THAN 1,000 health and emergency workers a week are being attacked while carrying out their duties.Doctors, nurses, ambulance crews, health visitors and firefighters across Britain are being subjected to frightening assaults as they go about helping the public.The scale of the problem is only now becoming clear, with increasing numbers of health professionals and emergency workers complaining that they have been beaten up, punched, kicked and pelted with bricks and stones.
Communications & Dispatch

SAN FRANCISCO -- Hayward, Calif., police and federal investigators did the grunt work, and it paid off:They tracked down and arrested a cell phone caller believed to have phoned the emergency 911 number more than 27,000 times making bodily noises, muttering in a disguised voice, and pressing the beep tone.On Wednesday night, police arrested John Triplette, 45, of Hayward on suspicion of abusing the 911 emergency line, a misdemeanor punishable by $1,000 fine and/or six months in jail.
Administration and Leadership

In his previous article. "Philosophies of EMS Paychecks," Howard Rodenberg, MD, MPH, discusses this philosophy behind government regulations, such as salary ranges for public employees. In the case of EMS, the industry and the government ideally have one goal -- keeping patients safe and providing quality care. Why, then, does it seem there is animosity between these two parties?
Communications & Dispatch

PHILADELPHIA -- Brenda Orr of Doylestown, Pa., was trapped in a burning bed, immobilized by multiple sclerosis, when she dialed 911 on Jan. 29.Twenty-eight seconds passed before a Bucks County dispatcher answered Orr's call.Then he put her on hold.It took 26 more seconds for a second dispatcher to pick up."911. The bed is on fire," Orr, 53, yelled into her phone.By then a minute had elapsed since Orr had first dialed. A half-minute later, she spoke her final words before the phone went dead.
Communications & Dispatch

ALLENTOWN, Pa. -- In a sweeping mea culpa, Bucks County officials announced Wednesday they had disciplined 11 dispatchers and four supervisors at the call center for botching a 911 call from a disabled Doylestown woman who died in a house fire Jan. 29.Ten dispatchers were available when Brenda Orr's call came in at 10:31 a.m., but the phone rang six times before an 11th dispatcher, who was already on an ambulance call, picked it up "out of frustration" and put it on hold, said Emergency Communications Coordinator Brent Wiggins.