Administration and Leadership

IAEMSC Kicks Off Annual EMS Leadership Summit

The International Association of Emergency Medical Services Chiefs (IAEMSC) opened its 2016 EMS Leadership Summit on Monday, Dec. 12, with a full day of pre-conference workshop sessions. The summit is being held in conjunction with the National Healthcare Coalition Preparedness Conference in Washington, D.C.

“The diverse audience gives IAEMSC members a great opportunity to develop new relationships, share best practices and lessons learned, as well as collaborate with other attendees from a variety of disciplines,” said IAEMSC president Paul Brennan.

Andrea L. Treese Berlin, Senior Counsel in the HHS Office of the Counsel to the Inspector General (OCIG) provides a briefing on activities by the OIG Administrative and Civil Remedies Branch.

The pre-conference workshop sessions are small, group presentations focused on a variety of emerging or continuing topics relevant to EMS leaders. The opening session, “EMS Compliance and Challenges” by Andrea Treese Berlin, senior counsel in the Office of the Counsel to the Inspector General (OCIG) in the Department of Health and Human Services, provided an overview of recent advisory opinions and enforcement actions by the OIG involving EMS agencies. Berlin also provided resources for EMS leaders to remain updated regarding enforcement actions and exclusion of individual providers by the OIG. The OIG website includes examples of corporate integrity agreements and the elements needed for a corporate compliance program.

Dr. Gregg Margolis, Director of the Healthcare System Policy Division in the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) delivers a presentation on the recently enacted Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Emergency Preparedness Requirements Rule for health care providers. 

Another session was led by Dr. Gregg Margolis, director of the Healthcare System Policy Division in the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR). Margolis described the recently enacted Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Emergency Preparedness Requirements Rule for healthcare providers. The rule, which must be implemented by healthcare providers who participate in Medicare and Medicaid by November 2017, will indirectly impact EMS agencies. The rule requires providers and suppliers to meet the following four common and well-known industry best practice standards:

1. Emergency plan—Based on a risk assessment, develop an emergency plan using an all-hazards approach focusing on capacities and capabilities that are critical to preparedness for a full spectrum of emergencies or disasters specific to the location of a provider or supplier.

2. Policies and procedures—Develop and implement policies and procedures based on the plan and risk assessment.

3. Communication plan—Develop and maintain a communication plan that complies with both federal and state law. Patient care must be well-coordinated within the facility, across healthcare providers, and with state and local public health departments and emergency systems.

4. Training and testing program—Develop and maintain training and testing programs, including initial and annual trainings, and conduct drills and exercises or participate in an actual incident that tests the plan.

The mission of IAEMSC is to support, promote and advance the leadership of EMS response entities and to advocate for the EMS profession. The IAEMSC membership is made up of leaders from both career and volunteer EMS organizations and proudly represents and embraces the diversity of EMS agencies throughout the world. Additional information is available at the IAEMSC website at www.IAEMSC.org. The IAEMSC Summit continues through Wednesday, with scheduled events providing formal and informal interaction among the attendees.