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  1. Searching for Victims in Kentucky - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    Subscribe | Newsletters | Advertise | Contact Us             Hello Edit Profile Logout Login or Register using Journal Supplements Subscribe Jobs Featured Jobs Search Jobs Post A Job Products Buyer's Guide Product Reviews Hot Products Hot Products Submissions Product Announcements Product Videos Technical Digests Webcasts White Papers Videos Ask the Expert Education & Training EMS 10 Interviews EMS Today Fitness JEMS Games Product Spotlight Home About Us Advertise Contact Us Our Team Authors Community News General News Industry News Company & People News Product Announcements Obituaries & Line of Duty Deaths Patient Care Abdominal & Gastrointestinal Disorders Allergies & Immunology Airway & Respiratory Cardiovascular & Hematology Diabetes & Endocrine Disorders Genitourinary & Gynecology & Renal Infectious Diseases Medications and Pharmacology Neurology Patient Assessment Psychiatric Resuscitation & Shock Toxicology Trauma Abdominal & Genitourinary Trauma Bleeding Burns & Soft Tissue Trauma Chest Trauma Environmental Emergencies Head, Neck, Spine and Nervous System Trauma Orthopedic Trauma Special Patients Geriatrics Obstetrics and Neonatal Pediatrics Special Challenges Administration & Leadership Communications & Dispatch Documentation & Patient Care Reporting Education and Training Leadership & Professionalism Legal & Ethical Protocols & Medical Direction Operations Ambulance & Vehicle Ops Air Medical Equipment & Gear Hazmat Provider Wellness & Safety Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Tactical EMS Major Incidents Mass Casualty Incidents Natural Disasters Planning & Incident Management WMD & Terrorism Mobile Integrated Healthcare Special Topics Case of the Month EMS Today Conference Hands On Product Reviews History of EMS Humor JEMS Games Research Surveys Technology   Home About Us Advertise Contact Us Our Team Authors Community News General News Industry News Company & People News Product Announcements Obituaries & Line of Duty Deaths Patient Care Abdominal & Gastrointestinal Disorders Allergies & Immunology Airway & Respiratory Cardiovascular & Hematology Diabetes & Endocrine Disorders Genitourinary & Gynecology & Renal Infectious Diseases Medications and Pharmacology Neurology Patient Assessment Psychiatric Resuscitation & Shock Toxicology Trauma Abdominal & Genitourinary Trauma Bleeding Burns & Soft Tissue Trauma Chest Trauma Environmental Emergencies Head, Neck, Spine and Nervous System Trauma Orthopedic Trauma Special Patients Geriatrics Obstetrics and Neonatal Pediatrics Special Challenges Administration & Leadership Communications & Dispatch Documentation & Patient Care Reporting Education and Training Leadership & Professionalism Legal & Ethical Protocols & Medical Direction Operations Ambulance & Vehicle Ops Air Medical Equipment & Gear Hazmat Provider Wellness & Safety Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Tactical EMS Major Incidents Mass Casualty Incidents Natural Disasters Planning & Incident Management WMD & Terrorism Mobile Integrated Healthcare Special Topics Case of the Month EMS Today Conference Hands On Product Reviews History of EMS Humor JEMS Games Research Surveys Technology Home Searching for Victims in Kentucky Searching for Victims in Kentucky Rescuers search among the devastation in Flat Gap for flood victims Thu, Jul 16, 2015 BRUCE SCHREINER and DAVID STEPHENSON, Associated Press FLAT GAP, Ky. (AP) — They roam the banks of the swollen creek, looking for those who were lost when a flash flood ravaged this rural eastern Kentucky community. They battle swarming mosquitoes and snake-infested creeks, piles of rubble 10 feet tall and mud so thick it sucks the shoes off their feet. For two days, rescue crews have trudged door-to-door across this rugged Appalachian terrain , painting orange x's on each structure they search. Hope is fading for the families who are watching them work. "You talk to them and they say, 'Right there is where my house used to be,'" said Randall Mulkey, a firefighter from a nearby county who volunteered to help with the search. He's seen homes splintered into rubble, others split in half and cars strewn in places he never could have imagined. Tromping through the mud is exhausting, he said. It breaks his heart to see people's belongings — clothes, toys, photographs — among the wreckage and know they lost everything they had. [Native Advertisement] Three are confirmed dead and another man is still missing. The fates of four more remain uncertain. Families reported them missing, but they may have escaped safety or could be stranded in their homes, without power or phone service, police say. Kevin Johnson believes his 34-year-old son, Scott, is dead, but his body has not yet been found. Scott Johnson was last seen wading through rushing floodwater with his 74-year-old grandmother on his back. He had already guided his father, uncle and sister from the raging flood that inundated their cluster of trailers. He turned back one last time to save his grandmother, whom he called Nana, and a 13-year-old family friend. "We told him, 'You can't make it,'" his father recalled. "He said, 'I'm going to get her out of that trailer." Standing in a cemetery on a hill overlooking the creek that had swallowed his son, Kevin Johnson was so overcome with grief he sometimes struggled to speak. He had watched his son push the boy to safety in the branches of a catalpa tree and hoist his Nana onto his back, only to be swept away. "Scott wouldn't turn her loose, that's why he died," said Veronica Marcum, Scott Johnson's sister. Her brother had been a musician. He went by the stage name Scott Free, started his own hip hop record label and released an album in 2013 called "Welcome to Hollerwood." He wrote on his website that he tried in his music to capture the Appalachian spirit and the struggle to survive amid the grinding poverty and drug addiction that has long tormented his native state. The grandmother he tried to save, Willa Mae Pennington, was found dead Tuesday among debris from the family's shattered mobile homes, Johnson County Coroner J.R. Frisby confirmed. Herman Eddie May Sr., 56, was also killed. His daughter, Amy Akers, said they lived next door to each other. When the water started to rise, he got in his car to search for a safe passage away. He reached the top of the hill and turned back to retrieve his daughter and two grandchildren. A neighbor begged him to stay on dry land. But he refused, Akers said. "He always said he would die trying to protect his family, and that's exactly what he did," she said. The car stalled in the rising water and May, a retired truck driver, got out. A neighbor threw him a rope, but a floating truck plowed into the car, he lost his grip and the water carried him away, Akers said. Neighbors pulled him from the water, but it was too late. The body of a third victim, 22-year-old Richard Blair, was found Wednesday afternoon on a creek bank in a pile of tree debris downstream from the rubble of a broken mobile home, the coroner said. The arduous search, destruction and death wore on rescuers. As the water receded, a crew found a car upside down and partially submerged in the creek. Flatwoods Police Officer Justin Stevens, helping in the search, stood on top of the car as they called for the jaws of life to tear it open and see if anyone had perished inside. But the car's owner arrived just in time, and told the crew it had floated there, unoccupied, from her home a mile away. "Thanks for not being in it," said Stevens said. "We really didn't want to see that." Seven cadaver dogs were aiding in the search, which stretches more than 8 miles from the town of Flat Gap south to Staffordsville — an area with 500 homes and 1,200 residents about 120 miles east of Lexington, police said at a news conference. Authorities estimate more than 150 homes were destroyed. Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear declared a state of emergency, giving local officials immediate access to state resources to assist in recovery efforts. Lt. Gov. Crit Luallen toured the destruction Wednesday and called it "gut wrenching." "I think all of us who are here and who have seen this in person recognize this as a truly devastating natural disaster," Luallen said. "People have lost everything." Families returned to the ruins of their homes to try to save what little they could. Church groups and others passed out sandwiches and water, neighbors banded together to clear heavy debris and police said they hoped there still might be some happy endings. Johnson County Deputy Sheriff Terry Tussey spotted a Chihuahua, alone and trembling, pacing a pile of debris on the other side of a creek. "She was dancing like she wanted to come across the creek but couldn't do it," he recalled. He trudged through the muck to find a safe crossing. Then he coaxed the little dog to him and cradled it back to his car. He drove around the afternoon with the tan dog in his lap, looking for its owner. A shelter was opened at the Paintsville recreation center, though many displaced residents turned to families and friends. Some who lost everything said they felt lucky to be alive. Robin Cisco sifted through the remnants of her daughter's trailer, digging her grandson's clothes and toys from the mud and rubble. The family barely got away: Her daughter ran from the trailer with her 18-month-old son as the storm hit and water started rising. "They got out and they're OK, that's all we were worried about," Cisco said. "All this other stuff can be replaced." ___ Associated Press writers Claire Galofaro and Rebecca Reynolds Yonker in Louisville, Kentucky, contributed to this report. Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. By Sponsored Content is made possible by our sponsor; it does not necessarily reflect the views of our editorial staff. Subscribe today to  JEMS In EMS, you never know what you'll be faced with as each new shift begins. The Journal of Emergency Medical Services (JEMS) is real-world EMS. It's informative, practical and an outstanding educational resource for EMS professionals. We're here to help you do your job more effectively, with content from writers who are EMS professionals in the field: Breakthrough Clinical Concepts Cutting-Edge Technology Annual Salary Survey Leadership & Professionalism Fundamental Assessment Tips New Product Reviews Compelling Case Studies and more... SUBSCRIBE DIGITAL EDITION   RECENT ARTICLES Drug Overdoses Rise Again Deaths in 2014 have gone up 7 percent from the previous year. Four Killed California Medical Helicopter Crash SkyLife chopper went missing during transport to Bakersfield. San Bernardino Medic Describes Treating Terror Attack Victims San Bernardino Fire Department paramedic was with the first SWAT officers to enter the scene Storms Kill Two, Cause Damage across Pacific Northwest Two people are dead and a major freeway blocked after dramatic storms. Christmas Comes Early for Young Burn Survivor New York girl lost her entire family and was severely burned in a 2013 fire Planned Parenthood Shooting: Highest Officer Casualty Count Colorado Springs had the most officers wounded in a single incident in two years. SUBSCRIBE DIGITAL EDITION   Featured Careers More Jobs   eNews Register for the JEMS eNewsletter, it's FREE! Sign-Up! JEMS Connect FEATURED GROUPS Disaster EMS   EMERGENCY! Lovers   Tactical Medicine   Humor In EMS     CURRENT DISCUSSIONS   JOIN JEMS CONNECT   EMS BLOGS Blogger Browser Today's Featured Posts Copyright © 2015: PennWell Corporation, Tulsa, OK. All Rights Reserved. UTILITY Home About Us Contact Us Terms of Use Subscribe Advertise Reader Service RSS Feeds Privacy Policy Topics News Patient Care Leadership Special Topics Major Incidents Operations Sections Authors Columns Community Jobs Journal Products Supplements Webcasts Complete Registration Please fill out the remaining fields to complete your registration. 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    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 16 Jul 2015

  2. Searching for Victims in Kentucky - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    Rescue crews search devastated Flat Gap community.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 16 Jul 2015

  3. Unique and Specialized Ambulances on Display at Interschutz 2015 - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    Specially configured ambulances for transporting patients with infectious diseases are showcased.

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    Mon, 15 Jun 2015

  4. Unique and Specialized Ambulances on Display at Interschutz 2015 - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    Specially configured ambulances for transporting patients with infectious diseases are showcased.

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    Mon, 15 Jun 2015

  1. Rescue and Recovery in Nepal

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    Tue, 28 Apr 2015

  2. Rescue and Recovery in Nepal - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    Death toll passes 4,000 and is expected to continue to rise as rescue teams search the ruins.

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    Tue, 28 Apr 2015

  3. Parents Doubt U.S. Is Ready to Protect Kids from Disaster, Yet Are Doing Little to Prepare, Poll Shows - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    Nine years after Hurricane Katrina, 74 percent of parents with children in school or child care believe the federal government is not very prepared to protect their children from disaster. Yet the average parent spent only one hour on family emergency planning over the past year—and many spent no ...

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    Wed, 3 Sep 2014

  4. Buildings Still Vulnerable 20 Years after Los Angeles Earthquake - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The earth lurched without warning before dawn, jolting Los Angeles from its sleep. In a flash, freeway overpasses collapsed. Buildings were leveled or ruined. Fires spread. Two decades after a magnitude-6.7 earthquake shattered Los Angeles and surrounding communities, buildings ...

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    Wed, 1 Jan 2014

  5. Military and Tactical Medics Gather at Florida Training Conference - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    For special operations forces medical personnel, the number one mission is bringing operators back home alive. Starting tomorrow, about 1,200 of the best in the business will gather in Tampa forthe Special Operations Medical Association's four-day conference dedicated to that proposition, which has ...

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    Sun, 1 Dec 2013

  6. Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons Advocates Teaching Hemorrhage and Airway Control to Bystanders - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    TUCSON, Ariz. - In today's world, terrorist attack or other social or natural disaster could create a medical scene comparable to a battlefield, and bystanders may be the first responders, write Steven J. Hatfill, M.D., and Jane M. Orient, M.D., in the winter 2013 issue of the Journal of American ...

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    Sun, 1 Dec 2013

  7. Typhoon Leaves Over 900 Dead in Philippines - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    TACLOBAN, Philippines (AP) — Typhoon-ravaged Philippine islands faced a daunting relief effort that had barely begun Monday, as bloated bodies lay uncollected and uncounted in the streets and survivors pleaded for food, water and medicine. Police guarded stores to prevent people from hauling off ...

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    Fri, 1 Nov 2013

  8. Aid Begins Arriving in the Philippines - Journal of Emergency Medical Services

    TACLOBAN, Philippines (AP) — The day after Typhoon Haiyan struck the eastern Philippine coast, a team of 15 doctors and logistics experts was ready to fly to the worst-hit city to help. On Tuesday, five days into what could be the country's deadliest disaster, they were still waiting to leave. ...

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    Fri, 1 Nov 2013

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