Beaten AMR Paramedic Flown Home - News - @ JEMS.com


Beaten AMR Paramedic Flown Home

Stow suffered a traumatic brain injury in a beating outside Dodger Stadium more than six weeks ago.

 

 
 
 

DEMIAN BULWA, The San Francisco Chronicle | | Tuesday, May 17, 2011

GALLERIES

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AMR Paramedic Stow Tranported to San Francisco

Bryan Stow arrived by ambulance to San Francisco General Hospital.
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Bryan Stow, the Giants fan who suffered a traumatic brain injury in a beating outside Dodger Stadium more than six weeks ago, was flown from Los Angeles to San Francisco General Hospital on Monday, bringing him closer to relatives and friends.

The goal, hospital officials said, is to prepare the Santa Cruz resident for another move, to a long-term rehabilitation center. But two weeks after he was taken off sedatives that induced a coma, the 42-year-old paramedic and father of two remains unconscious and in critical condition.

Stow had been at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center since two men beat him March 31 in a stadium parking lot after the season-opening game between the Giants and Dodgers. Dr. Geoffrey Manley, chief of neurosurgery at San Francisco General, said Monday that he and his colleagues had not yet assessed Stow's condition.

"Our goal at this point is to make sure he's stable" after the trip, Manley said.

He said the study of traumatic brain injuries is "where cancer was 30 or 40 years ago. We just don't know that much about traumatic brain injuries."

Stow's mother, Ann Stow, wrote on a family website recently that "Bryan's chances of waking up are slim but still there." On Friday, the family said he had been "responsive to stimulation, and while he doesn't do it on command, his eyes have been opening."

Rosa Saca, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, said Stow opened his eyes Monday morning while being moved from his bed to a stretcher. But she said it was difficult to know what that meant.

"It was an 'ah-ha' moment," she said. "The nurses said it was the longest they had seen him keep his eyes open. ... I don't think it was involuntary. I think it was pretty voluntary."

Saca added, however, that "from what physicians are saying, his recovery is going to be very long."

Daniel Franklin, a co-worker at American Medical Response, said Stow's family and friends "are just looking forward to having him closer. It's always a positive thing when someone's stable enough to be moved that far. We are continuing to pray for him and pull for him, because he has a long fight ahead."

Police are still looking for the two men in Dodger regalia who beat and kicked Stow. The Giants return to Los Angeles for a two-game series starting Wednesday.



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AMR Paramedic Stow Tranported to San Francisco

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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow, 42, who was severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium is transferred to an ambulance from Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center for a flight transferring him to a San Francisco Bay area hospital near where is his family lives on Monday, May 16, 2011 in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow, 42, who was severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium is transferred to an ambulance from Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center for a flight transferring him to a San Francisco Bay area hospital near where is his family lives on Monday, May 16, 2011 in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

An ambulance carrying San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow arrives at a hospital in San Francisco, Monday, May 16, 2011. Stow, 42, who was severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011, was jetted to Northern California for continued medical care. Stow was still in critical condition Monday as he was flown by a small private jet to San Francisco for care at the city's general hospital. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)


Gallery 1

AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

Ambulance attendants help San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow arrive at a hospital in San Francisco, Monday, May 16, 2011. Stow, 42, who was severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011, was jetted to Northern California for continued medical care. Stow was still in critical condition Monday as he was flown by a small private jet to San Francisco for care at the city's general hospital. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

Johnny Stow, center, cousin of Bryan Stow, Bryan Stow's friend Danny Simon, left, and Bryan Stow's former wife, Jacqueline Kain, right, arrive with San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow at a hospital in San Francisco, Monday, May 16, 2011. Stow, 42, who was severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011, was jetted to Northern California for continued medical care. Stow was still in critical condition Monday as he was flown by a small private jet to San Francisco for care at the city's general hospital. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

San Francisco General Hospital Chief of Neurosurgery, Dr. Geoffrey Manley, speaks during a news conference about the condition of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow who arrived at the hospital in San Francisco, Monday, May 16, 2011. Stow, 42, who was severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011, was jetted to Northern California for continued medical care. Stow was still in critical condition Monday as he was flown by a small private jet to San Francisco for care at the city's general hospital. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

San Francisco Giants fan Esther Barrera holds up a sign after Bryan Stow arrived at a hospital in San Francisco, Monday, May 16, 2011. Stow, 42, who was severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011, was jetted to Northern California for continued medical care. Stow was still in critical condition Monday as he was flown by a small private jet to San Francisco for care at the city's general hospital. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow, 42, is transported by plane to San Francisco General Hospital on Monday, May 16, 2011 from Los Angeles, where he's been in critical condition at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center. Stow has been in a medically induced coma for most of the past seven weeks, after being severely beaten outside Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

Dr. Geoff Manley, chief of neurosurgery at San Francisco General Hospital, gestures during a news conference about the condition of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow, who arrived at the hospital in San Francisco, Monday, May 16, 2011. Nearly seven weeks after a brutal beating outside Dodger Stadium, Stow, still in critical condition with brain injuries, was jetted Monday to Northern California for more medical care. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)


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AMR Paramedic Bryan Stow Goes Home

Bryan Stow, a Santa Clara, Calif., area paramedic who suffered brain damage in an attack on opening day of the Dodgers opener in March with his neurosurgeon Dr. Gabriel Zada, left, the LAC-USC medical team and the air and ground transport team move him Monday May 16, 2011, to a waiting ambulance at the County USC Medical Center Emergency Room Ambulance entrance Monday morning for transport to Burbank airport where he will be flown to San Francisco. (AP Photo/Al Seib,Pool)



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