Exclusives
FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle+RSS Feed
Fire EMSEMS TodayEMS Insider

FDNY Paramedic Debuts Second EMS Rap Video

0521-LC-DSC-3799

On the heels of the smashing success "Call 911," Fire Department New York (FDNY) paramedic Farooq Muhammad, EMT-P, has done it again just in time for EMS Week.

In "Call 911," Muhammad deftly rapped about an average day in the life of FDNY EMS providers, who spend their days on the gritty streets of New York providing care in the most dangerous of situations. It debuted during the department's 9th annual EMT/Paramedic Competition to an enthusiastic audience that included Emergency! star Randy Mantooth.

The clip garnered a lot of attention. "I got feedback from Germany, Poland, France, England," says Muhammad. "But I think this one will have an even stronger impact."

Mantooth will help debut "EMS Anthem" May 21 at this year's competition. This follow-up again portrays an average day in New York, which, as any FDNY paramedic knows, is anything but average.

"It starts off with me coming to work and changing into uniform, then goes into a normal day," says Muhammad. "It shows me treating an asthmatic patient, then a pedestrian struck, and it goes into the next scene, which is a cardiac arrest, then a shooting victim, then a chest pain patient."

As with "Call 911," Muhammad wrote the script, but the video was produced by a hired team. "Having previewed the new video, I think again Farooq and his team have done a fantastic job in developing new lyrics, new music and a great, realistic video," says John Peruggia, chief of EMS for FDNY.

Muhammad says "Anthem" is a personal project, but he's received a lot of support from the department. It's been his personal mission to show the public what EMS does and to reinforce to providers the value of their jobs and their bravery in performing them.

"People were really happy to see how they were portrayed in the video," he says. "They said it made them feel very good. EMS are rarely portrayed as heroes, and they are heroes. They're out there saving lives, in dangerous situations with people getting shot and on the freeway."

"[Muhammad's videos] highlight the professionalism and compassion that our members display everyday while performing their jobs," says Peruggia.

Despite his success at rapping, Muhammad has no plans to make it his full-time career. "I want to keep doing stuff like this, but I'm more about being a paramedic. That's who I am."
 

RELATED ARTICLES

A First Responder's Guide to Ebola

There are several things to think about when considering the treatment of an Ebola patient in the back of an ambulance in the traditional EMS setting.

Serving the Psychological Needs of Your Employees

How does your agency help employees cope with the traumas and stressors of EMS?

Pro Bono: Privacy within Mass Casualty Incidents

HIPAA compliancy in MCIs is challenging but feasible.

Medical Waste Not as Dangerous as its Stigma Suggests

Regulations are disproportionate to the risks involved.

Readers Sound Off About Glove Use After Patient Care

How often are you susceptible to potentially unclean surfaces?

Document On-the-Job Assault and Harassment

Be your own advocate.

Features by Topic

JEMS Connect

CURRENT DISCUSSIONS

 
 

EMS BLOGS

Blogger Browser

Today's Featured Posts

Featured Careers