EXCLUSIVES
FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle+RSS Feed
Fire EMSEMS TodayEMS Insider

Firefighters Put Their Prototype Stretcher to the Test at Kennedy

MELVILLE, N.Y.-- A trio of current and former city firefighters taking a business trip to promote a lifesaving rescue device they invented had an unexpected chance to put it to good use yesterday when a man on their plane suffered a heart attack.

Firefighter Thomas Fee and retired lieutenants Michael Harty and Frank Haskell boarded the early-morning flight at Kennedy Airport yesterday, on their way to meet a manufacturer for a small, lightweight stretcher they designed to transport sick or wounded people.

They took a prototype of the stretcher aboard, not knowing that within minutes, a fellow passenger would have a heart attack.

"I saw the face of his son," said Fee, 40, of South Hempstead. "You could see his fear."

Fee, Harty and Haskell sprang out of their seats, administered CPR and oxygen, and used a defibrillator given them by flight attendants to shock the unconscious patient in the chest, they said.

After stabilizing him, the firefighters used the stretcher -- which they call a rescue sled -- to take him down the airplane stairs to the terminal, from where paramedics took him to Jamaica Hospital in Queens, they said.

"We realized we had to move him quickly down the aisle," said Harty, 53, of West Islip. "We're just so happy we saved a life."

Hospital officials could not immediately confirm the heart attack victim's identity or condition last night.

Haskell, 48, of West Islip, said the city's Fire Department has asked for prototypes of the rescue sled for field testing.

Once their rescue mission was completed, the local heroes continued to their destination in Tennessee yesterday to try to make the rescue sled available to emergency responders everywhere.

"The bottom line is that we saved his life," he said. "Without this stretcher, it may have turned out different."

RELATED ARTICLES

Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival to Begin Collecting Data to Measure CPR Quality

Data will assist in providing uniform reporting metrics back to agencies to assist with their internal quality improvement efforts.

Epileptic Effect: The Aftermath of a Seizure isn’t Always What it Seems

You and your partner are dispatched to a 60ish-year-old female with signs and symptoms of a possible stroke.

Thorough Assessment is Crucial in Patients with Respiratory Distress

Accurate observation and treatment go a long way when considering all causes of respiratory distress.

Oklahoma City & Tulsa EMS Become First System to Adopt ResQCPR as a Standard of Care

Today the Medical Control Board for the EMS System for Metropolitan Oklahoma City and Tulsa, Okla., unanimously voted to approve the ResQCPR system by ZOLL a...

Tilt Angle Significantly Affects CPR

Test on pigs show patient tilt angle can have a positive effect on cerebral perfusion.

ZOLL ResQCPR™ System Receives Premarket Approval from the FDA

Chelmsford, Mass.— ZOLL® Medical Corporation, a manufacturer of medical devices and related software solutions, today announced that the company&rs...

Features by Topic

Featured Careers

 

JEMS TV

FEATURED VIDEO TOPICS

Learn about new products and innovations featured at EMS Today 2015

 

JEMS Connect

CURRENT DISCUSSIONS

 
 

EMS BLOGS

Blogger Browser

Today's Featured Posts