More Hospitals Using Multimedia To Show ER Wait Times

It's a marketing move aimed at less-urgent patients.


 
 

San Jose Mercury News | | Wednesday, August 25, 2010


WASHINGTON -- Need an X-ray or stitches? Online, via text message or flashing on a billboard, some emergency rooms are advertising how long the dreaded wait for care will be, with estimates updated every few minutes.

It's a marketing move aimed at less-urgent patients, not the true emergencies that automatically go to the front of the line anyway -- and should not waste precious minutes checking the wait.

"If you're in a car accident, you're not going to flip open your iPhone and see what the wait times are," cautioned Dr. Sandra Schneider, president-elect of the American College of Emergency Physicians.

Despite that fledgling trend, ERs are getting busier, forcing them to try innovative tactics to cut delays -- such as stationing doctors at the front door to get a jump-start on certain patients.

In 2012, hospitals are supposed to begin reporting to Medicare how fast their ERs move certain patients through, a first step at increasing quality of care across the board.

"The longer people stay in the emergency department, the more likely they're going to have complications, deaths. If they're elderly, they're more likely to end up in a nursing home," said Dr. Nick Jouriles, emergency medicine chief at Akron General Hospital in Ohio. It is among the hospitals that post estimated wait times.

ER visits set a record of more than 123 million in 2008, up from 117 million a year earlier, says preliminary data released this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A disturbing report last year from Congress' investigative arm found that too often, patients who should have been seen immediately waited nearly half an hour. Add in tests and treatment, and a trip to the ER can easily last three or four hours.

So, why post wait times that might encourage those who otherwise could have tried an urgent-care center?

There are no statistics on how many hospitals advertise wait times, although they tend to have multiple ERs in a region, usually the suburbs. The idea: Patients with less urgent conditions -- maybe they need stitches for a cut -- might drive a bit farther for a shorter wait, possibly helping a hospital chain spread the load without losing easier cases to competitors.

Perhaps more common than posting wait times are other attempts at easing the traffic jams:

In Nashville, Vanderbilt University Medical Center does "team triage," with a doctor, nurse and paramedics manning the ER's front door. They work the waiting room, ordering blood work or X-rays so that less-urgent cases -- like a sprained ankle -- may be diagnosed without ever tying up an ER bed and more complicated ones get a head start on diagnosis that can save 40 minutes a person.

Emergency medicine chief Dr. Corey Slovis said the ER averages a 20-minute wait to see the doctor, a number he hopes to cut in half. Team triage allows discharging about 15 patients a day directly from the waiting room.

The main cause of ER crowding is not an influx of sprained ankles but a lack of hospital beds for patients so sick they need to be admitted, leaving them "boarding" in the ER so there is no room to bring in new patients, said Dr. Peter Viccellio of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Mondays, when most hospitals fill inpatient beds with elective surgeries, are especially bad.

That jam is where Medicare is focusing first, as hospitals are to begin reporting in 2012 how quickly they move patients from the ER to inpatient beds. Still to come is a final decision on reporting additional wait times, such as how long it takes to see a doctor.



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