Video: Dedication Ceremony Opens 9/11 Memorial Museum

Survivors, family members and first responders tour site before public

 

 
 
 

JONATHAN LEMIRE and JENNIFER PELTZ, Associated Press | | Thursday, May 15, 2014

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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

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Dedication of 9/11 Museum

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NEW YORK (AP) — President Barack Obama praised the new Sept. 11 museum on Thursday as "a sacred place of healing and of hope" that captures both the story and the spirit of heroism and helpfulness that followed the attacks.

"It's an honor to join in your memories, to recall and to reflect, but above all to reaffirm the true spirit of 9/11 — love, compassion, sacrifice — and to enshrine it forever in the heart of our nation," he told an audience of victims' relatives, survivors, rescuers and recovery workers at the ground zero museum's dedication ceremony.

"Like the great wall and bedrock that embrace us today, nothing can ever break us. Nothing can change who we are as Americans."

After viewing some of the exhibits, including a mangled fire truck and a memorial wall with photos of victims, the president touched on some of the many stories of courage amid the chaos: the passengers who stormed a hijacked plane's cockpit over a Pennsylvania field and first responders who rushed into the burning twin towers. He also honored military members "who have served with honor in more than a decade of war."

He focused especially on the story of Welles Crowther, a 24-year-old World Trade Center worker and former volunteer firefighter who became known as "the man in the red bandanna" after he led other workers to safety from the trade center's stricken south tower. He died in the tower's collapse.

One of the red bandannas he made a habit of carrying is in the museum, and Crowther's mother, Alison, told the audience she hoped it would remind visitors "how people helped each other that day, and that they will be inspired to do the same in ways both big and small. This is the true legacy of Sept. 11."

By her side was Ling Young, one of the people Welles Crowther rescued.

"It was very hard for me to come here today," but she wanted to thank his parents, she said.

Before the ceremony, Obama walked quietly through an expansive hall with former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. First lady Michelle Obama, former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton following behind them.

The museum, which commemorates the 2001 terrorist attack, as well as the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, opens to the public on May 21.

Reflections from dignitaries — including New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, current New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and former Mayor Rudy Giuliani — were interspersed with the voices of everyday people caught up in Sept. 11.

Retired Fire Department Lt. Mickey Cross described being trapped for hours in the wreckage of the north tower — and then joining the recovery effort after being rescued. "There was a real sense of caring for each other," he said.

Ada Dolch, a school principal whose sister died at the trade center, recalled turning her grief into inspiration to open a school in Afghanistan. "What a kick in the head to Osama bin Laden!" she said.

Kayla Bergeron remembered walking down 68 flights of stairs in the north tower, amid confusion and fear that there was no way out. Her final steps to safety were on an outdoor stairway, now in the museum as the "survivors' stairs."

"Today, when I think about those stairs, what they represent to me is resiliency," she said.

By turns chilling and heartbreaking, the ground zero museum leads people on an unsettling journey through the terrorist attacks, with forays into their lead up and legacy.

There are scenes of horror, including videos of the skyscrapers collapsing and people falling from them. But there also are symbols of heroism, ranging from damaged fire trucks to the wristwatch of one of the airline passengers who confronted the hijackers.

The museum and memorial plaza above, which opened in 2011, were built for $700 million in donations and tax dollars.

___

Associated Press writer Josh Lederman contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Dedication of 9/11 Museum

Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

A New York City firefighter looks at the last column recovered at the World Trade Center site at the dedication ceremony for the National 9/11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. The museum memorializes the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. (AP Photo/John Angelillo, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

The remains of Fire Dept. of New York Ladder Company 3's truck are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Fragments of the fuselage of Flight 11, that hit the World Trader Center, are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

A steel beam from the World Trade Center stands at the center of Foundation Hall where the dedication ceremony will take place at the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. President Barack Obama and Sept. 11 survivors, rescuers and victims’ relatives are expected to mark the opening of the 9/11 museum, where the story of the terrorist attacks is told on a scale as big as the twin towers’ columns and as intimate as victims’ last voicemails. (AP Photo/The Star-Ledger, John Munson, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

A steel beam from the World Trade Center stands at the center of Foundation Hall where the dedication ceremony will take place at the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. President Barack Obama and Sept. 11 survivors, rescuers and victims’ relatives are expected to mark the opening of the 9/11 museum, where the story of the terrorist attacks is told on a scale as big as the twin towers’ columns and as intimate as victims’ last voicemails. (AP Photo/The Star-Ledger, John Munson, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton tour Memorial Hall at the National September 11 Memorial Museum with former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Thursday, May 15, 2014, in New York. Speaking at the dedication, the president said, no act of terror can match the strength and character of the United States. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

As the twin towers are displayed behind him, President Barack Obama speaks at the National September 11 Memorial Museum, Thursday, May 15, 2014, in New York. Speaking at the dedication, the president said, no act of terror can match the strength and character of the United States. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

President Barack Obama and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg tour the destroyed Ladder 3 truck at the September 11 Memorial Museum, Thursday, May 15, 2014, in New York. Speaking at the dedication, the president said, no act of terror can match the strength and character of the United States. He says, quote, "Nothing can ever break us." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

The honor guard comprised of members of the New York City Police, New York City Fire and Port Authority Police department's prepare prior to the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. President Barack Obama and Sept. 11 survivors, rescuers and victims’ relatives are expected to mark the opening of the 9/11 museum, where the story of the terrorist attacks is told on a scale as big as the twin towers’ columns and as intimate as victims’ last voicemails. (AP Photo/The Star-Ledger, John Munson, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, former President Bill Clinton, and Diana Taylor, tour the Memorial Hall at the National September 11 Memorial Museum, Thursday, May 15, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

President Barack Obama speaks at the dedication ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. The museum opens to the public on May 21. (AP Photo/John Angelillo, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

President Barack Obama greets Alson Crowther and Ling Young during the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York on Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/The New York Times, Chang W. Lee, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

First responders from the FDNY and Port Authority exit the stage during the Dedication Ceremony of the National September 11 Memorial Museum in the museum's Foundation Hall on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Newsday, Charles Eckert, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

People attend the Dedication Ceremony of the National September 11 Memorial Museum in the museum's Foundation Hall on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Newsday, Charles Eckert, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Recovery workers Manny Rodriguez, Pia Hofmann, Det. Anthony Favara and Lt. Stephen Butler speak beside the symbolic World Trade Center final beam, during the dedication ceremony in Foundation Hall, of the National September 11 Memorial Museum, in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Former New York Gov. George Pataki speaks as photos of 9/11 victims are projected, during the dedication ceremony in Foundation Hall, of the National September 11 Memorial Museum, in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

This Sept. 10, 2012 file photo shows electronic images of victims of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, destined to be a part of the future 9/11 Memorial Museum, during a news conference in New York. The museum will be dedicated in a ceremony attended by President Barack Obama on Thursday, May 15, 2014. It will open to the public May 21. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

The "Survivor Stairs," left, from The World Trader Center, are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

The burn mask, right, of a World Trade Center survivor who was injured by burning jet fuel, is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Members of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police pause at the Ground Zero memorial site during the dedication ceremony of the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York on Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Spencer Platt, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

A rose is placed on a name engraved along the South reflecting pool at the Ground Zero memorial site during the dedication ceremony of the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York on Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Spencer Platt, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Recovery workers Manny Rodriguez, Pia Hofmann, Det. Anthony Favara and Lt. Stephen Butler speak during the dedication ceremony in Foundation Hall, of the National September 11 Memorial Museum, in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

The Last Column was the final steel beam ceremonially removed from Ground Zero is shown at the dedication of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Timothy A. Clary, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Shoes and personal items on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

New York City Fire Department Firefighter Christian Waugh's helmet he wore on September 11, 2001, are on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Objects recovered from the World Trade Center site on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

A helmet New York City Fire Department Captain Patrick John Brown wore on September 11, 2001, on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Former President Bill Clinton, center, shares a laugh with first responders at the end of the Dedication Ceremony of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at Foundation Hall on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Newsday, Charles Eckert, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani hugs retired New York City Fire fighter Mickey Kross as he greets first responders from the Sept. 11, 2001 World Trade Center attacks during the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Segar, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani introduces 11 members of the FDNY and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey at the dedication ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/John Angelillo, Pool)


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New York City firefighters salute during the national anthem during the dedication ceremony in Foundation Hall, of the National September 11 Memorial Museum, in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, Pool)


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Retired New York City Fire Fighter Mickey Kross speaks at the podium as he and other first responders of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center take part in the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Segar, Pool)


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President Barack Obama speaks at the dedication ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/John Angelillo, Pool)


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The remains of New York City Fire Dept. truck from Engine Company 21 are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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The twisted remains of a portion of the television transmission tower from the World Trade Center is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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The Family Viewing Platform, and memorabilia from the World Trade Center, are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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A two-inch thick World Trade Center steel column, that was bent into a horseshoe shape, and facade segment, are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Steel from the World Trader Center north tower floors 97 and 98, left, is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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A section of steel facade, from floors 96-99 of the north tower of the World Trade Center, is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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A Port Authority of New York and New Jersey worker views a display of the attack on the Pentagon at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Two tridents from the World Trade Center are on display inside the National September 11 Memorial Museum before a dedication ceremony at the museum Thursday, May 15, 2014, in New York. The museum will open to the public on May 21. (AP Photo/Allan Tannenbaum, Pool)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

A sign tracking the time Osama Bin Laden was at large is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

A salvaged bicycle rack, that was located on the northern edge of the World Trade Center site, is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

The only existing model of the World Trade Center is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Members of the media tour the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

Members of the media tour the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

This June 16, 2011 file photo shows a fire-scorched cab of a New York City Fire Department truck, damaged in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, in storage at JFK Airport in New York. The truck will be on display in the 9//11 museum that will be dedicated Thursday, May 15, 2014, in a ceremony attended by President Barack Obama. It will open to the public May 21. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)


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Dedication of National 9/11 Memorial & Museum

This file photo of June 19, 2011 shows an American Airlines slipper stored in Hangar 17 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The slipper is an artifact from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks that is to be part of the National September 11 Memorial Museum, which will be dedicated Thursday, May 15, 2014, in a ceremony attended by President Barack Obama. It will open to the public May 21. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)



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