Emergency Medical Technician Develops New Nosebleed Treatment


 
 

Sabine Vollmer | | Tuesday, August 12, 2008


RALEIGH, N.C. -- Amy Rix is turning a technique that generations of her family have used to stop nosebleeds into a business.

Rix, trained as an emergency medical technician, has patented an invention she calls a nosebleed lip pack. It's basically a piece of soft material that is stuck under the upper lip and will, Rix said, stop nosebleeds in a minute or less.

Three years ago in Chapel Hill, N.C., Rix started RemedEase to bring the lip pack to market. Rix, who is also a research associate at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, is RemedEase's CEO and sole employee.

But now she's getting some help. The company recently raised about a half-million dollars from investors to make and test a prototype.

Among those who see the product's potential is Randy Myer, entrepreneurship professor at UNC's Kenan-Flagler Business School.

When he first heard about the lip pack four years ago, Myer said he considered the idea too simple to be original. But Rix hooked him with her patents.

"I thought, 'This gal is very serious about this,'" he said.

Since then, Myer has helped Rix recruit advisers and investors and is now the company's chairman. One adviser is James Buck, an executive at InnerPulse, a Durham, N.C., company that is developing a heart defibrillator.

"With an astounding 445 million episodes of recurring nosebleeds in the U.S. alone in 2007, there is clearly a large market," Buck said.

The lip pack has yet to prove itself in clinical tests. If it gets regulatory approval, it could benefit the 30 million to 40 million Americans who have frequent nosebleeds, including athletes, pregnant women, children and people using blood thinners.

Rix said her mother had a lot of nosebleeds when she was growing up. To stop the bleeding, Rix's grandmother would roll up a wad of wet paper and stick it under the child's upper lip. Later, her mother used the remedy on Rix's brother.

The pad restricts blood flow in two blood vessels that feed nosebleeds, Rix said. "It's like a Band-Aid."




Connect: Have a thought or feedback about this? Add your comment now
Related Topics: Medical Emergencies, Special Patients

What's Your Take? Comment Now ...

Featured Careers & Jobs in EMS





 

Get JEMS in Your Inbox

 

Fire EMS Blogs


Blogger Browser

Today's Featured Posts

 

EMS Airway Clinic

Simulation-Based Assessment Facilitates Learning & Enhances Clinical Judgment

Simulation is an educational tool that can be used to develop and refine clinical skills of the student in a controlled environment before they progress to becoming practicing clinicians.
More >

Multimedia Thumb

REMSA Programs Helps Reduce Hospital Visits

Community paramedic effort goes into service.
Watch It >


Multimedia Thumb

City Official Challenges San Francisco Fire Chief

Ambulance response times among problems noted by city supervisor.
Watch It >


Multimedia Thumb

Texas Ambulance Crash

Victoria ambulance collides with civilian vehicle.
Watch It >


Multimedia Thumb

Colorado Medics Ditch Pants for Kilts

“Real men do wear kilts.”
Watch It >


Multimedia Thumb

CO Leak at Illinois School

Girard incident sends over 130 to hospitals.
More >


Multimedia Thumb

Hands On September 2014

Who gets thumbs up this month?
More >


Multimedia Thumb

NYC Sept. 11 Anniversary

View images from the ceremony at Ground Zero.
More >


Multimedia Thumb

Field Bridge Xpress ePCR on iPad, Android, Kindle Fire

Sneak peek of customizable run forms & more.
Watch It >


Multimedia Thumb

VividTrac offered by Vivid Medical - EMS Today 2013

VividTrac, affordable high performance video intubation device.
Watch It >


Multimedia Thumb

The AmbuBus®, Bus Stretcher Conversion Kit - EMS Today 2013

AmbuBus®, Bus Stretcher all-hazards preparedness & response tool
Watch It >


Multimedia Thumb

LMA MAD Nasal™

Needle-free intranasal drug delivery.
Watch It >


More Product Videos >